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"Voices in the Valley"
The Tubac Historical Society Oral History Project
page 2 of 7

Narrator:

Elvira Hildalgo Amado
Yolanda Amado Wells

Tucson, Arizona

Interviewer: Betty J. Lane
Date of Interview: October 18, 1990

Lane: What were some of the families that you knew, besides your own family?
Amado: You mean here in Tucson?
Lane: Yes.
Amado: Well, the Aguirres, the Amados, Jacobs.
Wells: Elias.
Amado: Elias. My husband was an Elias. His mother was an Elias married to Amado. See, they were all friends. (laughs) Grew up in Tucson.

Wells: Jacomes.
Amado: The Jacomes.
Lane: Is that true so much, anymore? Are you still mainly your social life will revolve around the family and those old family friends?
Amado: No. Times have changed a lot.
Lane: How?
Amado: You hardly see your old friends now, unless there's a social gathering like when you go to the Pioneer gathering, you know, you see a lot of old friends.
Wells: Yes.
Amado: Gee, I don't know where else.
Wells: Funerals?
Amado: Funerals, yes! (laughs) And weddings.
Lane: What were the biggest celebrations in your girlhood?
Amado: Christmas.
Lane: And did they revolve around church activities?
Amado: I really don't remember. They used to have gatherings at the church once a year they'd have what they'd call ferias. What would you call it in English? Like a carnival. They'd have booths and have Mexican food. Sometimes they'd do it to raise funds for the church, also for the poor people.
Lane: Are we talking about a church called St. Joseph's? Or what church?
Amado: No, the cathedral.
Lane: San Augustín Cathedral?
Amado: Yes, that one.
Lane: That's where you went to church?
Amado: Yes. I was baptized there, confirmed, I got married. But that was the old church. You know, they tore it down and then rebuilt it.
Lane: Have you seen a lot of changes in the services at that church?

Amado: Yes.
Lane: It's changed from what you ...
Amado: Completely.
Lane: In what ways has it changed since you were a girl the church service?
Amado: Well, it used to be a Latin mass. And now it's Because they don't like the new mass.
Wells: Oh, everything is changed in the church. It's not the way it used to be.
Lane: Not so much Latin?
Wells: Oh no, we don't have any Latin. Although they are going to one Latin mass now at the convent in Sabino Canyon.
Lane: What was the name of that church?
Wells: It's a convent.
Lane: Oh, a convent.
Amado: Uh-huh.
Wells: That's the only Latin mass that they have in Tucson now.

Lane: Did they have the mariachi music as they do now at the cathedral?
Wells: Oh, no.
Lane: They didn't. Is that fairly new?
Wells: Oh, the mariachis were only for fiestas..
Amado: Uh-huh.
Lane: How many years do you think they've had that?
Amado: About twenty three years.
Wells: Since the new changes came into the church starting in 1963.
Lane: Do you still go to San Augustín's?
Amado: No, I go to St. Peter and Paul.
Lane: Which is close by.
Amado: Once in a while, we'll go over there. And then they have mariachis there, I think the 8:30 mass, but I don't like the mariachis in church.

Lane: I don't mean to pry, but why don't you like it?
Amado: Because it seems like you're at a party or a funeral. It's not as solemn.
Lane: Not as solemn or formal as you would like to see it.
Amado: Uh huh. And you feel like you can't meditate listening to that music.
Lane: But as a youngster you went on Sundays, and did you go other days of the week to church?
Amado: Just on Sundays.
Wells: Well, they used to have fiestas there.
Amado: Oh, then that was a special occasion.
Wells: Special saints' days and all.
Amado: Saints days and all, uh huh. Yes, we'd go days of obligation, but we always went to church on Sundays and Christmas, and of course all the holy days.

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