La Cadena Que No Se Corta: The Unbroken Chain

La Cadena Que No Se Corta en espagñol

la Comunidad, the Community
page 7 of 7

The Comunidad section at the University of Arizona Museum of Art exhibit, featured a mural by Luis Mena. That mural, which expressed the artist's deeply-held concerns about cultural and linguistic discrimination, served to highlight the comunidad exhibit. Also visible in this section were a low rider bike display and various kinds of paper art.

The paperwork corner at the exhibition, showing cascarónes, a wreath of paper flowers, and piñatas [21K]
The paperwork corner at the exhibition, showing cascarónes, a wreath of paper flowers, and piñatas (DB)

Mi Familia lowrider bike [32K] by Anthony Teran of the Dukes Car and Bike Club.
Mi Familia lowrider bike [32K] by Anthony Teran of the Dukes Car and Bike Club. (DB)

This outstanding bike display was one of several that rotated through the exhibition on a weekly basis. Note the way in which the display brings in religion, family and community.

Aztec costume by Rogelio Valdovín.
Aztec costume by Rogelio Valdovín. (DB)

This complex confection made of cloth, feathers, beads, applique, metal and glass is one of several such costumes that have been created over the years by Mr. Valdovín, a retired school custodian. He wears them on public religious and cultural occasions to instill pride of Indian ancestry among his fellow Mexicanos. An Image of the Virgin of Guadalupe appears somewhere on each costume he creates. Another of Mr. Valdovín's costumes may be seen elsewhere in this exhibit.

Prisoner art drawings of the Virgin of Guadalupe, one with a match stick frame.
Prisoner art drawings of the Virgin of Guadalupe, one with a match stick frame. (DB)

Prisoner art: a pair of baby shoes made of cigarette wrappers, two woven bracelets, a papier-mache crucifix on a handmade Bible page, and a decorated envelope.
Prisoner art: a pair of baby shoes made of cigarette wrappers, two woven bracelets,
a papier-mache crucifix on a handmade Bible page, and a decorated envelope. (DB)

Sacred and secular art such as this is produced in considerable quantity by Mexican-American prisoners throughout the Southwest. The themes usually involve ethnic identity or images from the Catholic religion, which for many people can amount to the same thing.

View short video clips of the la Comunidad section shot at a University of Arizona's Museum of Art exhibit in November 1996.

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