La Cadena Que No Se Corta: The Unbroken Chain

La Cadena Que No Se Corta en espagñol

el Hogar, the Home
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Shrine to St. Dymphna near downtown Tucson, April 1983 (JSG)
Shrine to St. Dymphna near downtown Tucson, April 1983 (JSG)

This recycled refrigerator shrine, no longer stands outside its house just south and west of downtown Tucson. A light shone inside the nicho, which contained St. Dymphna in the main compartment and a reclining statue of Saint Francis Xavier, the patron of southern Arizona and northern Sonora, in the freezer compartment.

Nicho containing the Sacred Heart of Jesus, June 1996 (JSG)
Nicho containing the Sacred Heart of Jesus, June 1996 (JSG)

This simple nicho on Tucson's south side has a floral design painted on its front edge. It provides a focal point of color and sinuous line in its otherwise austere front yard.

Nicho in South Tucson, September 1995 (JSG)
Nicho in South Tucson, September 1995 (JSG)

This nicho of cement faced with stone was built by Antonio Bray, who constructed the nicho for the exhibition La Cadena que no se Corta. It was photographed open on the night of its dedication. Note the two cutout metal doves on the door. The statue on the left inside is the Holy Child of Prague; that on the right is the Holy Child of Atocha.

Shrine to Our Lady of Guadalupe, March 1982 (JSG)
Shrine to Our Lady of Guadalupe, March 1982 (JSG)

A front yard shrine in central Tucson. Halfway between the traditional Mexican nicho and a more mainstream yard ornament, this assemblage maintains its baroque complexity and use of color.

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