La Cadena Que No Se Corta: The Unbroken Chain

La Cadena Que No Se Corta en espagñol

el Hogar, the Home
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The images on this page were created from slides shot by Tucson photographer David Burkhalter at the Museum of Art's exhibit. The museum show featured many color and black and white photographs from which a number have been selected to display on the website. All the artists represented by these images are Tucson residents.

Front yard corner with nicho
Front yard corner with nicho (DB)

Entering the exhibit, one found ones' self in a Mexicano front yard, created by Carmen Morales and Estela Federico. This shows a corner of that yard, with a small nicho (see next image), widely-spaced trees, a surrounding fence, and a border in the foreground made of white stones. All these features may typically be found in front yards on Tucson's southwest side.

Front yard nicho made by Antonio Bray.
Front yard nicho made by Antonio Bray (DB)

This small nicho, made especially for the exhibit, is faced with small pieces of white rock and contains images of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, St. Jude, and St. Anthony. It is further embellished with tiny lights and flowers.

The nacimiento or nativity scene created by Aurelia and Gilbert Araneta
The nacimiento or nativity scene created by Aurelia and Gilbert Araneta (DB)

This nacimiento contained over 1500 tiny lights and stretched seven feet on each side. In addition to the Adoration of the Shepherds and the Journey of the Magi, it contained the Holy Family at work, the Flight into Egypt, and Jesus with the Woman at the Well, in addition to a Mexican market, a ranch, a pottery shop, and the Virgin of Guadalupe appearing to Juan Diego. This is essentially the same nacimiento that Mrs. Araneta has set up in her living room for years.

A ranch scene from the Aranetas' nacimiento
A ranch scene from the Aranetas' nacimiento. (DB)
Note the tiny nicho to the Virgin of San Juan de los Lagos beside the ranch house.

Altar to the Virgin of Guadalupe arranged by Mrs. Alicia Alvarado
Altar to the Virgin of Guadalupe arranged by Mrs. Alicia Alvarado (DB)

This lovely statue usually occupies a place of honor in Mrs. Alvarado's sala or living room. Just prior to the day of Our Lady of Guadalupe, December 12, an elaborate altar such as this would be built, and an all-night vigil would be held on of December 11.

Deshilado or drawnwork by Toni Aguilar, background and her late mother, foreground (DB)
Deshilado or drawnwork by Toni Aguilar, background and her late mother, foreground (DB)

La Familia mural by David Tineo (DB)
La Familia mural by David Tineo (DB)

This portable mural, painted especially for the exhibition by one of Tucson's three leading muralists, shows the family surrounded by the possibility of violence but overshadowed by the home of peace. View additional murals by David Tineo in the Chicano Murals section of Southern Arizona Folk Arts.

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