In The Steps of Esteban: Tucson's African American Heritage

Go to A Brief HistoryGo to Biographies & Oral Histories
Go to Special Topics & Publications
Go to Photographic Exhibits
To to Lesson Plans & Ideas
Go to Videos
Go to Related Web Pages
Go to In The Steps of Esteban's homepage

Special Topics & Publications
Trailtones: The African-American Heritage of Arizona

Photographic Survey
page 2 of 2
[rights information on images]

Unidentified girl holding a doll.
Unidentified girl holding a doll.
[15K AHS, Buehman Collection, B#113,869]

C. C. Simmons
On the back of photo reads: C. C. Simmons. From Buehman Collection
[10K AHS, Buehman Collection, B#86,643]


Workers waiting to ship out cotton they probably helped harvest

Workers waiting to ship out cotton they probably helped harvest. Location is in Arizona. African Americans who came to work in the cotton industry in Arizona often found their talents working for them. In Dixie, they worked in the fields as slaves and received no wages at all, but in Arizona cotton seed pressers received more pay, according to a report by a former cottonseed presser, Mr. Foley, Sr. of A. Mountain. There was a certain amount of respectability connected with work in the cotton industry, because of the absence of slavery.
[23K AHS, #14513]

 



During the turn of the century, one of the leisure time activities would be to picnic at San Xavier. Many church groups used to do this and sometimes groups passing through Tucson would book such a ride out to San Xavier. In this instance we have a Mr. Davis and his party on the way to San Xavier. Later photos show the group at the Mission.
[23K AHS, Buehman Collection, #B89,406]


Segregated public school near Cashion, Arizona. This is in the Maricopa County area

Segregated public school near Cashion, Arizona. This is in the Maricopa County area.
[19K AHS, #2179]

 


group of marching majoretters and drum and bugel corps appear in the rodeo parade in Tucson, Arizona.
Dunbar Junior High School during days of segregation. This group of marching majoretters and drum and bugel corps appear in the rodeo parade in Tucson, Arizona. They are sponsored by the American Legion Post #38: The Col. Charles Young American Legion. It was named after one of the African-American stationed at Ft. Huachuca and was the post commander at one time.
[29K AHS, #75985]


Mr. Lawson, a member of one of the fraternal groups of Tucson.
Mr. Lawson, a member of one of the fraternal groups of Tucson. He obtained the rank of Major, as indicated by his tie emblem. The rank may be a former military rank, or one obtained within the group.
[9K AHS, Buehman Collection, B#50]

 



Aviation history began with the flights of such aviators as Janet Bragg, female pilot who worked with others to convince the President that African Americans possessed the capability to fly. She helped build an airstrip and flew her own plane. Later came the training of the Tuskegee Airman at Alabama. Vernon Haywood, above left, trained with that group of pilots and became a colonel in the Air Force. He is pictured here at a base in Chandler, Arizona. Bragg and Haywood helped to create a chapter of the Tuskegee Airman in Tucson. Senior Master Sergeant Fred Archer became its president and died in office and the Chapter is named after him. Another Tuskegee Airman: Al Penn has a B-25 named after him at the Pima Air Museum, near Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson, Arizona.
[15K AHS, #78197]

Return to the Trailtones Contents page