Southern Arizona Folk Arts
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El Arte Folklórico del Sur de Arizona en espagñol

An Occupation and a Region: Cowboy and Western Folk Art

Arizona has been cattle country since the 1680s, when Jesuit Missionary Eusebio Francisco Kino, S.J., drove herds of cattle to the Native villages he intended to missionize. The techniques for working cattle in dry, open range were developed by Mexican vaqueros and passed on the U.S. cowboys in the late 19th Century. The American stock saddle is descended from an earlier Mexican prototype. Much of the cowboy's traditional equipment likewise has Mexican origins.

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