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El Arte Folklórico del Sur de Arizona en espagñol

Paper Flowers

Paper flowers are made for a number of uses. They decorate booths at festivals and fiestas, they decorate home altars, and every November, they are made for All Souls' Day to decorate the graves of the family dead. Some paper flower makers simply make generalized flowers, but a few women (and this seems to be a woman's art predominately) take pride in reproducing fifteen or even twenty different kinds of flower in paper.

Paper flowers decorating a booth at the Tumacacori Fiesta. December, 1987
Paper flowers decorating a booth at the Tumacacori Fiesta. December, 1987
[image courtesy of James S. Griffith]

Although these paper flowers were made for sale as souvenirs, their are no different from those created to decorate family altars and graves.

Paper flower corona or wreath by Josefina Lizárraga, Tucson, June, 1982
Paper flower corona or wreath by Josefina Lizárraga, Tucson, June, 1982
[image courtesy of James S. Griffith]

Ms. Lizárraga learned to make many different kinds of paper flowers when working in a paper flower factory as a young woman in her native state of Nayarit, Mexico. Here in Tucson she operates a florist shop and obliges by occasionally making paper flowers to order, or by giving workshops in her art.

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