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Quilts From Randolph, Arizona

Mrs. Ella Mae Muldrow with an unnamed quilt, December, 1979
Mrs. Ella Mae Muldrow with an unnamed quilt, December, 1979
[image courtesy of James S. Griffith]

Unlike many Anglo-American quilters, Mrs. Muldrow is not preoccupied with control, symmetry and precise duplication of designs in this quilt. She is a competent seamstress; had she wished, for instance, to make her vertical and horizontal strips match each other, she would have easily done it. Her intent, rather, seems to be to take a simple pattern - nine squares of opposed triangles - and create as many variations as possible. Notice the two right-hand squares in the second row from the bottom - the shapes are the same, but the variation lies in the degree of color contrast in each square.

Mrs. Ella Mae Muldrow with a "String quilt," December, 1979
Mrs. Ella Mae Muldrow with a "String quilt," December, 1979
[image courtesy of James S. Griffith]

In this remarkable tied quilt, Mrs. Muldrow has once again worked with color contrast - while some of the knots are in colors that contrast strongly with the colors of the strips, others are of the same color.

Mrs. Lenora Mathis' "Light and Shade" quilt, December, 1979
Mrs. Lenora Mathis' "Light and Shade" quilt, December, 1979
[image courtesy of James S. Griffith]

Mrs. Mathis has here taken a common organizing pattern - the concentric strips of the "Log Cabin" quilt, and created a unique, bold quilt of strongly contrasting colors.

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