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Through Our Parents' Eyes
 

Military Aircraft Nose Art: An American Tradition

First Gulf War:
A New Twist on An Old Theme

Miss B. Havin
Miss B. Havin

Miss B. Havin was painted on an E-2C Hawkeye aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt during Desert Storm. According to an article in Wikipedia, "E-2C uses computerized sensors to provide early warning, threat analyses and control of counteraction against air and surface targets. It is a high-wing aircraft with stacked antennae elements contained in a 24 foot (7.3 m) rotating dome above the fuselage."

Our thanks to Tim Westmorland, then a Navy Illustrator/Draftsman aboard the Roosevelt, for providing an image of Miss B. Havin and permission to include it in the website. [email Tim Westmorland]

Mr. Westmorland added this information.

Because there were no women aboard the Theodore Roosevelt, Miss B. Havin remained on the plane for its entire deployment. When crew and plane were returning to the States, a huge squadron sticker was placed over Miss B. Havin until landing at the Navy Base. Once on the base, the squadron sticker was removed and Miss B. Havin was restored. It was reported that crew members had pictures taken standing with their wives by Miss B. Havin and a few were even carried in hometown newspapers.

The complete story of the Nose Art on Theodore Roosevelt goes like this. I'm not sure who decided but they had a nose art contest on the ship between the many squadrons deployed. I was approached by the Commanding Officer of VAW-124 to do the Nose Art. It was a slick move on his part since I was the only Illustrator/Draftsman on the ship and all of the other entries in the contest were just people who had talent. I designed the Nose Art on poster board first, then he approved it, and we went to the plane with the image. The plane was an E2C Hawkeye. I used an Iwata Airbrush and small paint brushes to complete the art work. Then they judged the images and I was lucky enough to win the contest. They gave me a plaque on the ship's TV that was turned over to the Commanding Officer of the squadron to hang in their Ready Room. He gave me a leather flight jacket when the deployment was over.

The only place I have been able to find the other entries into the Nose Art Contest was on The Pierce Studio website.

If you have more nose art from Desert Storm aircraft send an email. Acounts like Mr. Westmorland's are greatly appreciated.