Maps of the Pimeria: Early Cartography of the Southwest, by Jack Mount

18th Century

1703. Guillaume Delisle. Carte du Mexique et de la Florida des Terres Angloises et des Isles Antilles du Cours et des Environs de la Riviere de Mississipi
1703. Guillaume Delisle. Carte du Mexique et de la Florida des Terres Angloises et des Isles Antilles du Cours et des Environs de la Riviere de Mississipi. Paris, Chez l'Auteur sur le Quai de l'Horloge, 1703. Colored map 48 x 65 cm. Scale ca. 1:8,700,000. [G3301 S1 1703 D3]. 1082X800 | 812X600

Delisle's work begins another new era--this map is considered a "towering landmark for Western cartography" and rightfully so. Among a collection of advancements, this is: the first printed map with the names of the Colorado and Gila (as "Hila") Rivers, and to have the Gila nearly geographically correct; and the first map to accurately delineate the mouth of the Mississippi and much of the Mississippi Valley. It is interesting to note that, for all his progress, Delisle still wavers on California as an island. This is one of the earliest published maps with the printed name Pimeria and to have detailed mapping of that region. Delisle most certainly had access to one of Kino's manuscript maps, for that part of the map uses Kino cartography and placenames.

Guillaume Delisle (1675-1726) was the leading French cartographer in the early eighteenth century. He was noted for his prolific production (over 100 maps) and exceptional accuracy. He was appointed Premier Geographe du Roi in 1718.

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