Maps of the Pimeria: Early Cartography of the Southwest, by Jack Mount

19th Century

1846. Henry Schenck Tanner. A Map of the United States of Mexico as Organized and Defined by the Several Acts of the Congress of that Republic, Constructed from a Great Variety of Printed and Manuscript Documents by H.S. Tanner
1846. Henry Schenck Tanner. A Map of the United States of Mexico as Organized and Defined by the Several Acts of the Congress of that Republic, Constructed from a Great Variety of Printed and Manuscript Documents by H.S. Tanner. 3d ed. Philadelphia, Tanner, 1846. Colored map 58 x 75 cm. Scale ca. 1:5,500,000. [G4410 1846 T16]. 1022X800 | 767X600

Tanner used John C. Fremont's map of 1845 for features of the upper Great Basin, however, for the region south he had no data. For Arizona and Sonora the map is a throwback to the cartography of many years earlier. Tucson is again spelled "Tubson". The region between the Galiuro and Pinaleno Mountains is termed "Valle de la florida". Curiously, the Casa Grande Hohokam ruin is labeled "Ruins of the 2nd houses of the Aztecs"! It is interesting to note that the southern boundary of Upper California runs southwesterly from the mouth of the Gila River to a point on the coast near Pt. Mondrains. It has been speculated that if map makers that copied Tanner's maps had used the same boundary configuration, today the United States might own more of Baja California.

Tanner's maps of Mexico have received notoriety due to their association with the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. There are five editions of Tanner's Mexico map and several of the earlier editions were copied-- apparently plagiarized--by the map publishers White, Gallaher and White of New York. Then, J. Disturnell of New York copied White's map. Disturnell's 1847 edition of the map of Mexico was attached to the official copies of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.

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