Through Our Parents Eyes
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Tom & Louise, 1904-1911
Charting an Early Life Together

Later Louise wrote: " Soon after we were married, he decided to install a pump to supply water for the neighborhood and our own property (this included the Santa Catalina Apartments). Instead of a gasoline engine, he purchased a hot air Ryder Erickson pump that was obsolete even at that time and most unsatisfactory. We had great difficulty in obtaining replacement parts as they were no longer manufactured. This engine required refueling every twenty minutes and was a failure every way. One summer when I was away he ordered a new windmill although the one we had was as efficient as it was possible to be. When the windmill arrived I read the directions and found it was for a shallow well, only 20 feet or less, while our well required a line of over 100 feet. He failed to read the circular when he first wrote for it."

A cottage built on the back (north) end of the Marshall lot.
A cottage built on the back (north) end of the Marshall lot.
The house to the left faces Olive Road. Telephone lines are along Speedway
.

Louise and Tom did have many good times together. They had special ways of sharing their time. Early on Sunday mornings he would take her for a drive around the quiet city and out into the countryside. She chose that time because she could observe changes without meeting other people. In the early days, the Sunday morning trips were accomplished in horse and buggy; later an automobile provided the transportation. Other times they reverted to an activity that had initially brought them together. They walked out into the desert to seek out and examine plants; much as they had done on the grounds of the University when she was a botany instructor and he a groundskeeper. Both had intense interests in environmental issues and those provided both bonding and individual pursuits throughout their relationship.

 

Carriage House. This good sized structure housed horses and rolling stock owned by the Marshalls. It was a common practice for Tom to take Louise for rides around town and the countryside to inspect her properties and seek out new opportunities.
Carriage House. This good sized structure housed horses and rolling stock owned
by the Marshalls. It was a common practice for Tom to take Louise for rides around
town and the countryside to inspect her properties and seek out new opportunities.

Another outlet for the Marshall's environmental activism came through their involvement with the Arizona Audubon Society. Both became charter members of the chapter on April 15, 1908. Herbert Brown was the founder and first president of the Arizona Audubon Society, and was also curator of the Territorial Museum located on the University campus. Because of his position Brown came into regular contact with Tom Marshall and the young man developed and gave public lectures on birds under the elder's tutelage. As usual, Tom required the best equipment available and this led to the purchase of a Model C Balopticon projector costing $40.00. The projector utilized light created by an electrical spark and a carbon-arc. The carbon, shaped round and somewhat larger than a pencil, was fed into the machine by the operator. It took skill to feed the carbon at the correct speed. The slides Tom used were standard from the 1890s; a 4"x3-1/4" glass plate with emulsion on side to retain the image.

A prospector and loaded burro on Rincon Road in front of the Marshall house.
A prospector and loaded burro on Rincon Road in front of the Marshall house.

Continue with In The Front Parlor 1905