Through Our Parents Eyes
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Drifting Apart, 1911-1916
Community Action

Grace Eposcopal Church was located on the corner of Braodway and Stone Avenue from 1891 to 1914.
Grace Eposcopal Church was located on the corner of Braodway and Stone Avenue
from 1891 to 1914.

This Methodist Church was located on South Sixth Avenue a block south of Broadway. The Willard Hotel was directly south of the church. This was Louise Foucar's church when she first came to Tucson.
This Methodist Church was located on South Sixth Avenue a block south
of Broadway. The Willard Hotel was directly south of the church. This was
Louise Foucar's church when she first came to Tucson.

An early location of Trinity Presbyterian Church on South Scott Avenue. This building was originally constructed in 1907 and remains standing today next to the Masonic Temple. Tom Marshall attended this church. The existing Trinity Presbyterian Church stands on the corner of University Boulevard and North Fourth Avenue.
An early location of Trinity Presbyterian Church on South Scott Avenue. This
building was originally constructed in 1907 and remains standing today next to the
Masonic Temple. Tom Marshall attended this church. The existing Trinity Presbyterian
Church stands on the corner of University Boulevard and North Fourth Avenue

Sometime during 1911, Tom and Louise began to grow apart. Each became more engrossed in their own pursuits. Involvement in each others projects tended to strain the relationship even more. To be sure, the marriage continued, but the intimacy, muted because of Louise's physical frailty and Tom's restless energy became even more distant.

Louise continued her activities in loaning money for development around the University neighborhood. She also continued an aggressive building program of rental units in the same area. Louise could always be counted upon to support a good project or extend assistance to a young student in need. No one will ever know the full extent of her philanthropy because she gave so much money anonymously.

Tom approved of and sometimes recommended worthy causes, but for the immediate future, his ambitions were drawn decidedly toward politics. The early years of the Twentieth Century's second decade represented heady times for Arizona and the Old Pueblo. The Federal Government had authorized in 1910 the calling of a Constitutional Convention to prepare for statehood.

On February 14, 1912, Arizona became the forty-eighth state. As the statehood drama was playing out its final acts, turmoil in the National Republican Party provided some local political drama. Theodore Roosevelt, a favorite among local conservationists, progressives, and veterans of the Rough Riders, bolted the party and announced his intentions to run as a independent under the banner of the Progressive or "Bull Moose" Party.

Delegates from Arizona to the Progressive Party Convention in Chicago in 1912. Tom Marshall is standing, second from the left in the back row.
Delegates from Arizona to the Progressive Party Convention in Chicago in 1912.
Tom Marshall is standing, second from the left in the back row. The other delegates
are: FRONT ROW, SEATED (left to right) - Paul Fernell, Ben F. Daniels, A. L. Cummings,
Dwight B. Heard, E. K. Cummings, Frank Townsend, W. D. Tuttle. BACK ROW,
STANDING (left to right) - Walter B. Congdon, Marshall, P. H. Hays, Mrs. Frank
Townsend, Robert S. Fisher, Adolph Braatz. The photo was taken by the Moffett Co.,
Chicago, 1912
.

Tom Marshall heeded the call. That summer, he was among the delegates who gathered in Chicago to launch the Roosevelt candidacy. He treasured the formal portrait taken in Chicago and saved the convention paraphernalia. He returned to Arizona to spread the message and worked hard to see Roosevelt elected president. That was not to be, however, and the Democratic candidate, Woodrow Wilson, won the election.

Even after Roosevelt lost the election, Tom continued his interest in politics and the Progressive Party. Two years later, in June 1914, while Louise had her annual summer visit with her mother in Massachusetts, she received a telegram from Tom.

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