Through Our Parents Eyes
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Thomas Keith Marshall's Lantern Slides
Prohibition and Bird Watching Themes

About the Prohibition and Bird Watching slides website

During the months of developing Tom Marshall's Tucson and The University Neighborhood websites, Patricia Stephenson shared many interesting artifacts once owned by Tom and Louise Marshall.

One day I called to ask her for clarification on Tom's relationship to Grady and "Gradine" Gammage. Patricia wrote briefly about their relationship with Tom in the chapter Politics & Newspaper. Readers affiliated with Arizona State University will recognize the name, Gammage, because Grady was President of ASU from 1933 until his death in 1959. Anyone who has visited ASU's Tempe campus undoubtedly has seen the Grady Gammage Memorial Auditorium, one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s last designs.

As Patricia filled me on details of the Gammages and Marshalls, she mentioned, matter-of-factly, how she has Tom's slide projector and glass slides from the time of his involvement in the Prohibition movement. And, any time I wanted to see them, to let her know.

That afternoon I stopped by to see the Balopticon Model C lantern projector (coal oil converted to electricity) and about 150 glass lantern slides. Both the Balopticon and the slides were housed in their original carrying cases. Patricia had no hesitation in letting me put them in my car and bring them to campus where Gary Mackender, our QTVR expert, captured images of the Balopticon for a 360° QTVR panorama.

I asked for suggestions on how best to digitize the glass slides from members of the IMAGELIB listserv and explored how other sites were presenting similar content. Over the next couple weeks, I digitzed the images and began developing a concept for presenting them on the Web. From exploring different online collections, I developed the metadata elements linked to each thumbnail. For example, I found the University of Oregon Libraries Photograph Collection a useful model.

Unfortunately, the slides are not in good condition. Many have cracks and many have suffered from being stored in a Tucson, Arizona, garage. My emphasis is on bringing them to the Web as new content readily available to students and interested researchers.

To navigate through the site, use the previous and next buttons at the bottom of each page or click the text links to the right to go the first page of the Prohibition slides or the first page of the Birds slides.

Questions, comments and suggestions are welcome.

Stuart Glogoff, October 11, 2007
stuartg@email.arizona.edu