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Nome Alaska, 1900-1901
Photos from Tom's Album

When the Klondike gold rush began in July, 1897, miners took ships from Seattle and San Francisco for the Yukon gold fields. The miners who rushed north in search of gold became known as stampeders. In 1900, 20,000 stampeders came to the the beaches of Nome, where a prospector panning the sand found that it was full of gold dust.

From a photo taken by Patricia Stephenson on the Nome beach. This wooden marker commemorates The Stampeders.
From a photo taken by Patricia Stephenson 1995, on the Nome beach. This
wooden marker commemorates The Stampeders
.

Woman sifting for gold. This commercial photo proves that everyone was bitten by gold fever, regardless of gender.
Woman rocking for gold. This commercial photo proves that everyone
was bitten by gold fever, regardless of gender.

When the ice melts. This commercial photo shows a group of men in the center trying to free two horses stuck in the mud. Note the tent camp across the inlet.
When the ice melts. This commercial photo shows a group of men in the center
trying to free two horses stuck in the mud along the Snake River. Note the tent camp
across the inlet
.

Photo of Snake River approximately where the above photo probably occured.
Photo taken by Patricia Stephenson 1995 along the Snake River in Nome,
approximately where the above photo probably occured.

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