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CHAPTER V:
THE PIMA REVOLT OF 1751

B. Tracks In the Dust

While the people of Tubac waited out the rebellion in the north, their home town was not left entirely deserted. There was in fact considerable traffic through the place from time to time.

The native alcalde of the ranchería of Huachuca passed through seeking his relatives who had lived at Guebavi (Fontes Dec. 17, 1751:19v). Apparently a division of Captain-General Luís Oacpicagigua's warrior horde operating toward the royal fort at Terrenate completed the incineration of the prerevolt ranchería sometime early in December (Ruiz de Ael, Dec. 17, 1751:18v). Two days after Christmas Ensign Joseph de Fontes arrived at Tubac from Terrenate fort. Finding fresh tracks, he hoped to locate the local Indians, but discovered only one Pasqual, an ambassador from Father Ignacio X. Keller to the rebels according to his story, with a female relative and child. Not quite trusting the Indian, Fontes invited him to continue on with his column, not quite in the quality of a prisoner. Before long Pasqual broke loose and Fontes' men were unable to catch him. The woman told the Ensign that the Indians of Cocóspera and Suamca were living in the Santa Rita mountains east of Tubac, and he released her with her horse to go tell them he would do them no harm since they 120were not among the active rebels (Fontes Dec. 25, 1751:48v-49).

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