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CHAPTER VI:
THE ROYAL FORT OF ST. IGNATIUS AT TUBAC

E. 7. Reports

Although the geographic isolation of the frontier posts such as Tubac permitted their commanders to operate very independently of higher authority in every day matters, they always remained outposts of a giant colonial administrative machine which required intelligence of the activities of its least components, duly certified in writing.

Royal regulations called for semi-annual reports from the frontier fort commanders, but little attention was paid them in the Province of Sonora. Anza seems to have been somewhat better than most of the Sonoran captains about 220submitting reports, but Field Marshal Pignatelly y Rubí still had to jog him to prepare more detailed daily summaries.  These could be very dull resumes of the effective complement of the post from day to day, but the king's inspector perceived that they could be very useful at higher levels of administration if they contained details of the expeditions made, the passes and watering places found, and other description of frontier service (Rubí Dec. 31, 1766a).

Under the New Regulations of Royal Forts promulgated in September of 1772 which went into effect at Tubac June 1, 1774, post commanders were required to submit monthly reports on day-today events at the posts or on campaign (O'Conor Aug. 16, 1775). Operational diaries should express distances, directions, movements, mountains, watering places and their quality, number of Indians encountered in battles, number of prisoners of either sex taken, dead and wounded; the order of attack or defense by the Indians, the dispositions of the Spanish commander for attack or defense,, and the loss in dead and wounded sustained (ibid.).

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