Through Our Parents Eyes
Jump to Menu Jump to Content

The University from 1903 - 1906
Farewell to Territorial Days

Old Main ca 1910 A new view this time from the newly built Science Building.
Old Main circa 1910. A new view this time from the newly built Science Hall. TKM

The 1906 map and 1906 campus. This map drawn by J. B. Wright, city engineer is accurate only for this particular year, but has been used throughout my book and this website.
The 1906 map and 1906 campus. This map drawn by J. B. Wright, city engineer is
accurate only for this particular year, but was used throughout my book and in this
website. It gives a good relationship between the town and the University, as well as
providing names for places within the City of Tucson, as recorded in public records
.

Herring Hall and South Hall
Herring Hall and South Hall. Herring Hall with its four Doric columns resembles a
Greek temple more than a gymnasium. Is the second oldest building still standing on
campus, resembles the nearby South Hall. (In 1990 the next building west,the former
Arizona Hall is now named South Hall) This picture would have to be taken after 1913
as in the background is the Reuben Schweitzer residence at the comer of Fourth and
Highland. Purchased by the UA in 1918 for an infirmary, used for flu epidemic. In the
1924 Tucson city directory it is listed under Hospitals as UA Pest House 1447 East Fourth.
Remodeled in 1936 for the UA Nursery School. In 1949 the UA Nursery School was located
downstairs and Home Management students slept upstairs. I had both classes. Now the
site of the Science Library. TKM

Herring Hall in 2007.

Herring Hall in 2007. Originally used as a gymnasium, by 1939 it became a
perfect little theater, then a radio and television station. Herring Hall was built in
1903, making it the second oldest standing building on campus. Compare it with Tom
Marshall's photo from 1903
. PPS

This website, as already stated, is not a complete history of the University. There have been other buildings built on campus that are not mentioned. For a complete history, consult Phyllis Ball's excellent book A Photographic History of the University of Arizona 1885-1985.

Continue with Tradition in the Making