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Louise Henriette Foucar
First Woman Professor at the University

The Botany Office and Classroom in Old Main showing hte microscopes used by graduate student Louise Foucar.
The Botany office and classroom in Old Main showing the microscopes used by graduate
student Louise Foucar. The room, sometimes identified as Professor James Toumey's
office, became Instructor Foucar's office when she succeeded Professor Toumey as
Instructor in Botany.
Photo courtesy Special Collections, University of Arizona Library.
Old Main Interior, 1896-1910, N-10, 948.

First page in her histology book, it reads: "Louise Foucar University of Arizona January 1899."
First page in her histology book, it reads:
"Louise Foucar University of Arizona
January 1899." PPS

Sketch of plant tissues.
Sketch of plant tissues. Louise saw through the microscope on January 13, 1899, after Professor Toumey "showed me how to use the microscope and how to make slides." She named the book Histology and filled it with fine-line pen sketches. PPS

View all of Louise Foucar's hand-drawn sketches in her 1899 Histology.

Miss Louise Foucar was offered a position as instructor at the University during the fall semester 1899.

Professor Toumey's Instructor's Report. He wrote: Louise Foucar -- work incredible.
Professor Toumey's Instructor's Report. He wrote:
Louise Foucar -- work incredible. PPS

Besides botany, she taught beginning English, college classes of freshman French, freshman Latin, first year (prep) French, second and third year Latin. The next year, in addition to above classes, she taught plane geometry. One of her geometry students was a thirty-year-old prep student, Thomas Marshall, who would play an important part in her life.

Louise and Faculty 1900-1901
1899-1900 UA Faculty. Instructor Foucar in her second year of teaching at the University stands third from left.
Instructor Foucar in her second year of teaching at the University stands third from
the left. Standing left to right: W. W. Skinner, F. Yale Adams (who would soon be the
next President), Louise Foucar, Sherman M. Woodward, Emma Monk Guild, Frank N.
Guild, Howard Hall, Robert Forbes, Nora Towner. Seated: Mary Plimpton, G.E.P. Smith,
President Millard Parker, David Holmes and Mrs. Mary Aguirre. Not pictured are William
Phipps Blake, Mabel Hoover, Opal McGaughey and David Griffiths.
Photo courtesy Special
Collections, University of Arizona Library. Faculty 1895-1910, N-2333. FB

Mary Plimpton was Associate then Acting Professor of English, the highest ranking woman faculty member. The next year Instructor Foucar's title would be "Professor of Ancient and Modem Languages." Louise bought land and soon would build her home. Many of the faculty would be her close neighbors.

Portrait made from the above photo
Portrait made from the above photo. Photo courtesy Special Collections,
University of Arizona Library. Faculty 1895-1910, N-2333 (partial). FB

The third year she taught she became Professor of Ancient and Modem Languages. This was the first time a woman had been listed in the Register as a full professor, and I did not find another woman listed for fifteen years.

There were more students in the school now, and the beginning Spanish class was so large it had to be held in two divisions. Thomas Marshall was enrolled in her fall 1901 Spanish class.

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