Through Our Parents Eyes
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The Marshall Home and Neighborhood, 1906 - 1920
Olive Road

1919 map of north side of campus adapted from a Sanford Fire Map, with captions showing sites of various homes mentioned in this book.
1919 map of north side of campus adapted from a Sanford Fire Map, with captions
showing sites of various homes mentioned in this book. Maricopa Hall is in the
process of being built, so it looks as though it is crowding West Cottage. The cottage
was demolished in the summer of 1920.

Olive Road was a block-long street west of the land that the Louise Foucar had chosen for her home in 1901. In 1902 Professor Robert Forbes owned all the land from the Professor Blake's home to the alley beside Professor Foucar's home. Olive Hill was the name of his subdivision shown on the 1906 map. Seven houses were built on the east side of the street, no houses were ever built on the west side. (An aerial photograph). Robert Forbes home shows in the 1902 picture. He lived in his house more than sixty years.

Most of the Olive Road residents were faculty members. The Marshalls were providing water for several of the houses by 1905. The Sanford Fire Map has a good diagram of the houses.

Marshall home and century plant.  Now you can see it! A close look at the blooming century plant. Stone retaining wall is added in front of house, the post and pipe fence to the east side of the yard.
Marshall home and century plant. Now you can see it! A close look at the blooming
century plant. Stone retaining wall is added in front of house, the post and pipe fence
to the east side of the yard. To the right, at the base of the palm near the pipe fence,
is the Night Blooming Cereus. No house is visible between the fence and the mountains.
Palm Road will become a pleasant neighborhood of homes. On this comer lot, facing Palm
Road, the Marshall Terrace studio apartments will be built in 1951. Marshall Terrace
was Louise Marshall's last building project. TKM

 Night blooming cereus! When it bloomed Tom took many pictures of it.
Night blooming cereus! When it bloomed Tom took many pictures of it. The night the
cereus blooms is an event worth staying up to see, and it has a beautiful fragrance.
In my father's diary for June 7, 1936, he was at Mrs. Marshall's home to see it
bloom and happened to remark that it was his fifteenth wedding anniversary. She went
in the house, wrote my parents a note of congratulations and a check for twenty-five
dollars. A couple of years later my father came home with what looked to me like an
overgrown sweet potato. Mrs Marshall had given him the cereus. The root is a large
tuber. We enjoyed its flowers for years. TKM

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