Through Our Parents Eyes
Jump to Menu Jump to Content

The Marshall Home and Neighborhood, 1906 - 1920
People Who Came to Visit

Many people in the pictures that I have are not identified. When my parents first looked at the Foucar/Marshall pictures in 1956, they returned pictures that had a name on them. So I have "thank you" notes instead of pictures.

Prospector heading east up Rincon Road to the Rincon Mountains or the Catalinas. He looks properly packed for some serious prospecting.
Prospector heading east up Rincon Road to the Rincon Mountains or the Catalinas.
He looks properly packed for some serious prospecting. TKM

Parade in front of house, ca. 1914. Another team (to right) is ready to follow.
Parade in front of house, ca. 1914. Another team (to right) is ready to follow. Part of the
fun of living close to campus is the parade goes right by your home. You always are
part of the campus activities. From this view, the blooming century plant in the front
yard appears to be taller than the house. TKM FB

Snow and Pima Canyon
Snow and Pima Canyon. The clouds outline Pima Canyon in the Santa Catalina
Mountains. A small snow-covered triangle (in the center right in the picture) apparently
at the end of the canyon, and above the fence, is the Smith home on Speedway.
The shadow in the foreground snow-covered road shows the outline of North Hall. TKM

Miguel and Andela Tapia holding the baby Robert Garcia between them.
Miguel and Andela Tapia holding the baby Robert Garcia between them. Miguel
was employed by the Marshalls from 1920 to 1950. A home was provided for them on
West Simpson Street. About 1950 when the freeway came through that area, Louise
purchased another home for Angela, who was by then a widow. Angela and Louise
always conversed in Spanish. TKM

The bungalow by the Marshall home was moved. This photograph shows workers
The bungalow by the Marshall home was moved. This photograph shows workers
preparing it for the move, circa 1910. TKM

A second photo of the bungalow being prepared for the move.
A second photo of the bungalow being prepared for the move. TKM

Addition to the Marshall home under construction.
Addition to the Marshall home under construction. TKM

A room was added for meetings after the bungalow was moved, this room was added. Mrs. Marshall and her guests enjoyed listening to musical recordings. When I was just ten years old Mrs Marshall gave me her wind up table model Victrola, several dozen gold and red seal Victor records and the 1902 Victor book of The Opera. The gold-seal records were very expensive, some costing as much as five dollars. The records were purchased at the Fisher Music Company in Tucson. Between winding the victrola and sharpening the cactus needles, playing music took the listener's full attention. (I think of that now when I put six CDs in the multiplayer magazine.)

Audubon Society meetings might have been in this room or at the University. I have the Constitution and Bylaws booklet of the Arizona Audubon Society (established April 15, 1908, incorporated February 7, 1918, Thomas K. Marshall, President), a Balopticon Model C lantern projector (coal oil converted to electricity) and 75 glass slides of various birds. [view the 360 degree QTVR of the Balopticon] There are also 75 glass slides supporting the Prohibition movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries and 75 slides of birds. [view a website devoted to the glass slides] In the Audubon booklet is a tribute to Herbert Brown, "The Founder and first President of the Arizona Audubon Society a naturalist and ornithologist of national reputation.... " It then refers to "his remarkably large collection of bird skins donated to the Museum of the University of Arizona". In 1946 Mrs. Marshall gave my father a zinc covered box about 5'x5'x3' containing a dozen wooden drawers holding hundreds of bird skins all carefully labeled, mostly collected in the 1880s, and in a perfectly preserved condition. When my mother had to move from our family home in 1972, she offered them to the University. They eventually paid her a hundred dollars. The person who came to move the large box took one look at it and said, "We already have one like this, the Brown collection." I hope they are taking good care of both.

This society is not a predecessor of the present Tucson Audubon Society which was an outgrowth of the same people who enjoyed a bird club section of the Tucson Natural History Society. My father was an officer in both for years. In 1951 when the Tucson Audubon Society started here, my father asked me to make a two-color picture of a Vermilion Flycatcher for the membership cards. The Vermilion Flycatcher is still used for their logo but it is a different drawing.

Luxuriant folliage and high fashion are seen in this photograph.
Luxuriant folliage and high fashion are seen in this photograph. The 1911 negative
is a 5" x 7" glass plate. The unidentified lady is well protected from the sun by
gloves, hat and parasol. TKM

Another lady with parasol from a glass negative similar picture as above.
Another lady with parasol from a glass negative, similar picture as above. TKM

Continue with The Brick Barn and Carriage House